Author: 1333-healthvot

This post contains affiliate links.Listen, I have no problem with wearing amazing heels during pregnancy. I say if you can swing it, then do it. You can even check out my post on high heels for the people that ‘tut tut’ you about them.However, when I was pregnant, the swelling in my feet made them look like two loaves of baked bread that had been crammed into gravy boats Cinderella-stepsister-style, so I was always on the lookout for comfortable shoes.Here are some of the best lightweight, supportive, and most importantly, comfortable shoes for pregnancy and beyond recommended by pregnant people.Best…

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Nigra is a graduate student in the Mailman School’s Department of Environmental Health Sciences. (Photo courtesy of Anne Nigra) NIEHS-funded researchers reported that exposure to arsenic in drinking water was significantly reduced among Americans using public water systems after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lowered maximum levels of arsenic in 2006. The new findings, reported Oct. 22 in the journal Lancet Public Health, confirmed that federal drinking water regulations helped decrease toxic exposure and protect human health. Compliance with the regulation led to a 17 percent decline in urinary arsenic levels, equivalent to an estimated reduction of more than 200 cases of…

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When Is Peripheral Artery Disease an Emergency?More than eight million Americans have peripheral artery disease (PAD), in which narrowed or blocked arteries lead to circulatory problems in the arms and legs (especially the legs), making it hard to walk without pain. Yet what people with PAD may not realize is that the condition also puts them at a higher risk for coronary artery disease, heart attack, and stroke.“Patients who have lower extremity PAD have a greater than 80% chance of having some degree of coronary artery disease or carotid artery stenosis (narrowing of the carotid arteries that supply blood to…

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This post contains affiliate links.Congratulations! You’ve finally managed to squeeze a few consecutive hours of sleep out of your baby. They’ve adopted a semi-regular sleep and bedtime routine. Life is about to get easier.Just kidding. It’s daylight saving time!Once upon a time, the fall time change meant a glorious extra hour of sleep. For parents with babies, toddlers, and kids, daylight saving time can be a real pain in the ass. To help prepare for the biannual clock switcheroo on Sunday, November 7th, we’ve partnered up with the fine folks at Hatch Baby to share some tips for adjusting to…

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You laced up your running shoes, were full of motivation, and finished a fantastic run. But suddenly, fatigue sets in, and you feel totally exhausted. Have you ever experienced this? You might have been hit by running fatigue.What is Running Fatigue?Running fatigue is a physical state of exhaustion that occurs when someone runs (too) hard or runs long distances regularly. When constant exhaustion occurs, the body can’t recover fully. Thus, the fatigue is carried over to the next training session. Why? Because it takes time for your body to eliminate waste products from your tissues and muscles and to repair…

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The 2017 annual meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA) in Atlanta Nov. 4-8 offered scientific presentations on a vast range of public health topics. This year’s theme was Creating the Healthiest Nation: Climate Changes Health. Participants from NIEHS presented key talks, panels, posters, and provided information to other attendees through the institute’s exhibit booth. According to NIEHS Communications Director Christine Bruske Flowers, hundreds of attendees visited the NIEHS booth this year. “There’s definitely a growing desire among public health professionals for more information on connections between our environment, and physical and mental ailments,” she said. The NIEHS communications…

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When someone you care about is diagnosed with coronary artery disease, there’s a lot to learn. Whether they’ve had a heart attack or found out after testing, you may have questions or want to help them manage the condition.Support from family members and close friends means a lot. But there’s a fine line between caring and overstepping.“It shifts your relationship when someone is newly diagnosed with a serious condition,” says Ellen Carbonell, program manager and clinical lead in the Health and Aging Department at Rush University Medical Center’s Social Work and Community Health Department. “Many times, a caregiver starts feeling…

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Because pregnancy is just one glamorous surprise after another, there are a few factors that could be causing wetness in your underwear during your third trimester. Most of the time this experience is completely normal and harmless. But if you’re reading this, you may be questioning if what you’re experiencing is urine, discharge or amniotic fluid. In my experience, it was indeed amniotic fluid, and I barely made it to the hospital in time for delivery.Here’s a list of ways to help figure out what’s causing the wetness, all done from the comfort of your home – but no matter…

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Williams said the discovery challenges the dogma that TOP2-DPCs need to be slowly broken down, or proteolyzed, into small peptides to be reversed. “We show that the entire TOP2-DPC can be directly removed quickly en masse to protect genome integrity,’ he said. (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw) An international team led by NIEHS scientists was the first to discover a new way that cells fix an important and dangerous type of DNA damage known as a DNA-protein crosslink (DPC). The researchers found that a protein named ZATT can eliminate these crosslinks with the help of another protein, known as TDP2.…

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The COVID-19 pandemic strained health care systems around the world — and it also challenged medical organizations that support children with serious medical conditions and their families. Many of these national and international groups pride themselves on providing support services and memorable experiences for children who face serious and/or life-threatening illnesses — which often include in-person assistance and events that had to be curtailed, limited, or adapted during the past 2 years for safety reasons. These organizations had to pivot by finding creative ways to help families, canceling some services and programs that could put people at risk, and adapting…

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