Author: 1333-healthvot

Counselling Directory has seen a surge in searches for ways to improve sexual intimacy in long-term relationships over the past two years. Here, psychosexual counsellor Charlene Douglas shares her advice for reconnecting with your significant otherWriting for Happiful has many upsides, and the most significant for me is the ability to talk to mental health professionals and pose the questions we know our readers are asking and worrying about. Quite often, these queries resonate personally too, and it’s reassuring to know that no single problem is unique.One topic that’s attracted a huge amount of queries on our Happiful family site…

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Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW) Superfund study area (yellow), showing Boeing Field on the lower right and West Seattle on the left. (Photo courtesy of EPA) A century ago, engineers and city planners straightened and deepened the Duwamish River to create an industrial center for the young city of Seattle. As the city grew, the waterway became contaminated with sewage, toxic chemicals, and storm water runoff. In 2001, the river was listed as a Superfund site. Now, the University of Washington (UW) Superfund Research Program (SRP) is promoting a new video series and a book, released July 11, to educate people…

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Water contamination on tribal lands was the focus of a recent webinar series funded in part by the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP). More than 400 attendees tuned in for Water in the Native World, which wrapped up July 15. The online discussions were an extension of a special issue of the Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education, published in April. The University of Arizona SRP Center(https://tools.niehs.nih.gov/srp/programs/Program_detail.cfm?Project_ID=P42ES004940) Community Engagement Core (CEC) organized the webinars and publication. “These projects highlight examples where Indigenous perspectives are included in the research and also drive the research questions,” said Karletta Chief, Ph.D., who…

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Before becoming director of OFCD, Collins chaired the NIEHS Trainees’ Assembly, which helped her learn about the needs of early-career scientists. (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw) The 23rd Annual NIEHS Biomedical Career Symposium drew more than 370 people from around the country July 24. “The [event] aims to provide trainees and early-career scientists with an opportunity to explore various career options in the biomedical sciences and create a network as they plan for their future,” said Tammy Collins, Ph.D., director of the institute’s Office of Fellows’ Career Development (OFCD). Due to COVID-19, the meeting was held online. Sharing practical knowledge…

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This year, the NIEHS Environmental Career Worker Training Program (ECWTP) celebrates 25 years of preparing disadvantaged, underserved people for jobs involving environmental cleanup, construction, hazardous waste removal, and emergency response. ECWTP, which is part of the institute’s Worker Training Program (WTP), provides participants with pre-employment education, health and safety instruction, and life skills. Trainees in Chicago learned how to install solar panels. (Photo courtesy of OAI, Inc.) To date, 13,000 workers in more than 25 states have benefited from the program, with a historical job placement rate of 70%. According to a 2015 analysis, the economic value of ECWTP in…

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At the beginning of the pandemic, many people thought that COVID-19 would be a so-called great equalizer. Because no one was immune to the new coronavirus, everyone could be affected, regardless of race, wealth, or geography. Instead, the pandemic proved to be the great exacerbator, hitting marginalized communities the hardest, according to Marccus Hendricks, Ph.D., from the University of Maryland. Hendricks combines environmental justice and disaster vulnerability factors to ensure low-income, communities of color accounted for in extreme event responses. (Photo courtesy of Marccus Hendricks) Hendricks spoke at the Inaugural Symposium of the NIEHS Disaster Research Response (DR2) Environmental Health…

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Li is an Intramural Research Training Award fellow in DeMayo’s group. (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw) Although the U.S. death rate due to ovarian cancer has steadily declined since 1992, the disease still poses a considerable health risk to women, according to the National Cancer Institute. With that knowledge informing their work, NIEHS researchers may have determined what is driving the development of ovarian cancer in mice and humans. Rong Li, Ph.D., of the NIEHS Pregnancy and Female Reproduction Group, and Margeaux Wetendorf, Ph.D., a former member of the lab, found that the hormonal receptor known as progesterone receptor B…

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Lazar also directs the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. (Photo courtesy of Mitchell Lazar) The latest NIEHS Distinguished Lecture focused on how an organism’s circadian rhythms, or the physiological processes that regularly change based on a 24-hour period, influence metabolism. Mitchell Lazar, M.D., Ph.D., the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor in Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, presented “Nuclear Receptors, Circadian Rhythms, and Metabolism” Oct. 13 using the Zoom platform. Two nuclear receptors, Rev-erb and PPARgamma, are at the core of Lazar’s research.…

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The 2021 Society of Toxicology (SOT) awards are out, and NIEHS Intramural Research Training Award fellow Suzanne Martos, Ph.D., is a winner! Her study of the effects of tobacco smoke on the human immune system won a Best Postdoctoral Publication Award. The paper appeared in the July 2020 issue of Cell Reports Medicine. “I am honored to be receiving this award,” said Martos. “I am very grateful for help from my research group, which was instrumental in supporting our initial findings.” (Photo courtesy of Steve McCaw / NIEHS) Martos is a member of the Environmental Epigenomics and Disease Group, headed by Douglas Bell,…

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The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods(https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/pubhealth/evalatm/index.html) (NICEATM) joined with other government agencies and international partners to apply advanced nonanimal technologies to COVID-19 research. The Microphysiological Systems for COVID-19 Research (MPSCoRe) Working Group, which held its first meeting Jan. 29, is co-chaired by NICEATM Acting Director Nicole Kleinstreuer, Ph.D. Microphysiological systems(https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/whatwestudy/niceatm/test-method-evaluations/mps/index.html) (MPS) — sometimes referred to as organs-on-chips — use human cells and engineered structures to create an environment that mimics, or models, the function of organs such as lungs (see sidebar). This 2011 photo show a MPS that models lung function for…

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